Light Directional Elements (LDIR)

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GRØN DYST 2010 Technical University of Denmark

Light Directional Elements (LDIR)
Paper
Author:Kasper Bayer Frøhling (Department of Micro- and Nanotechnologi, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)
Mette Funding la Cour (Department of Micro- and Nanotechnologi, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)
Mohammed Jassim Ismaiil Al-Abaddi (Department of Micro- and Nanotechnologi, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)
Søren Vang Fischer (Department of Micro- and Nanotechnologi, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)
Supervisor:Peter Bøggild (Department of Micro- and Nanotechnologi, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)
Anders Kristensen (Department of Micro- and Nanotechnologi, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark)
Date: 2010-06-25     Track: Main     Session: 1
DOI:10.4122/1.1000000097
DOI:10.4122/1.1000000098

Using the light of the sun as the primary source for illuminating offices and houses is one of the most effective ways of saving energy. The problem, which many knows, is that on a sunny summer day, the light may be too intense to be used directly. Reading a book if the rays of the sun hits directly on the pages can be impossible, not to mention the problem of seeing what is happening on the computer screen. By using nanostructured windows it is possible to homogeneously redirect natural light, eliminating the need for using blinds and electric lighting during daytime.